1965 Bobby Fischer Newspaper Article Archive

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The Miami News Miami, Florida Tuesday, August 03, 1965 - Page 14 ()

Chess Champ Can't Play Cuba
NEW YORK — The State Department has refused to allow Bobby Fischer, 22-year-old United States chess champion, to play in an international tournament in Cuba later this month.
“He does not fall within the department's established criteria,” was the explanation for turning down Fischer's request that his passport be endorsed for travel to Cuba. The young grand master from Brooklyn made the request June 29 through his attorney. Andrew P. Davis. The lawyer explained that Fischer had been invited to play in the Capablanca memorial tournament in Havana Aug. 25.

Chess Champ Can't Play Cuba

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The Gazette and Daily York, Pennsylvania Tuesday, August 03, 1965 - Page 2

State Dept. Bars U.S. Chess Champion From International Tourney In Cuba
© York Times News Service
New York — The State department has refused to allow Bobby Fischer, the 22-year old United States chess champion, to play in an international tournament in Cuba later this month.
“He does not fall within the department's established criteria,” was the explanation for turning down Fischer's request that his passport be endorsed for travel to Cuba.
The young grandmaster from Brooklyn made the request June 29 through his attorney, Andrew P. Davis. The lawyer explained that Fischer had been invited to play in the Capablanca Memorial tournament in Havana on Aug. 25.
Players have also been invited from Argentina, Britain, Canada, Denmark, the Netherlands and Spain, as well as from Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia. Players are to be paid living and travel expenses and will compete for cash prizes, including a $2,000 first prize.
Davis noted that skill at chess carries “tremendous world-wide prestige,” and declared that Fischer's participation in the tourney — win or lose — would serve the best interests of the U.S.
The lawyer's letter to the State department concluded:
“Wouldn't it be a fantastic American victory should he carry all the marbles home from Cuba?”
Travel to Cuba has been restricted since Jan. 16, 1961, when the State department declared all U. S. passports to be invalid for travel there unless specifically endorsed.
A state department spokesman said yesterday that current regulations allow only three classes of Americans to travel to Cuba:
1—Bonafide journalists.
2—Businessmen with longstanding interests in Cuba.
3—Persons on humanitarian missions, such as relatives of prisoners or very ill Cubans.
Davis tried unsuccessfully to persuade the department that Fischer qualified under the first category.
Fischer had planned to represent two magazines, the Saturday Review and Chess Life. His request for travel documents was accompanied by letters of credentials from both publications, as well as a letter from Col. Edward P. S. Eagan of the People-to-People Sports committee.
The department spokesman said Fischer could not be regarded as a legitimate journalist, however, since “his primary purpose is to play chess; any articles he might write would be secondary.”

State Dept. Bars U.S. Chess Champion From International Tourney In Cuba

The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Tuesday, August 03, 1965 - Page 18

U.S. Refuses Chess Champ Cuba Passport
New York (AP) — An attorney for Bobby Fischer, 22-year-old United States chess champion, said today he knew of no “political” reason why the State Department refused Fischer permission to play in an international tournament in Cuba.
The lawyer, Andrew P. Davis, commenting on a published report that Fischer was turned down by the passport office for travel to Cuba, said a letter dated July 27 read:
“He (Fischer) does not fall within the department's established criteria.”
The tournament in Havana is scheduled for Aug. 25.
Davis said Fischer's request for travel documents was accompanied by letters of credentials from the Saturday Review and Chess Life, which Fischer planned to represent.
A department spokesman said yesterday that present regulations allow only the following three classes of Americans to travel to Cuba:
1. Bona fide journalists;
2. Businessmen with longstanding interests in Cuba;
3. Persons on humanitarian missions, such as relatives of prisoners or Cubans who are very ill.
The department spokesman said Fischer could not be regarded as a legitimate journalist because “his primary purpose is to play chess; any articles he might write would be secondary.”

U.S. Refuses Chess Champ Cuba Passport

The New York Times New York, New York Wednesday, August 04, 1965 - Page 34

Bobby Fischer Checkmated
There was something especially ridiculous about the State Department's denying passport authorization for Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, to go to Cuba. “He does not fall within the department's established criteria,” a spokesman solemnly explained.
Just how the Brooklyn grand master would be contaminated by playing in the Capablanca Memorial Tournament in Havana, along with players from a great many countries, defies imagination. The only danger he could run would be from his own uncertain temperament, but that is something he risks in every tournament.
In order to bar Bobby Fischer, the State Department is even breaking its own rules, since accredited journalists have always been allowed to go to Cuba and Mr. Fischer has credentials from Saturday Review and Chess Life. It now seems that one has to be a “bona fide journalist” and not just a journalist.
So to the rejected categories of American teachers, students, scientists, authors and artists we must now add chess players. This is the reductio ad absurdum of a policy that harms the United States a lot more than it does Cuba.

Bobby Fischer Checkmated

Detroit Free Press Detroit, Michigan Wednesday, August 04, 1965 - Page 4

U.S. Checks Chess Champion
Bobby Fischer, 22-year old chess champion from Brooklyn, does not qualify as a journalist, the State Department has ruled. Therefore, he will not be allowed to compete in a tournament in Cuba.
Fischer had been invited to the Havana Tournament in August, at which players from both sides of the Iron Curtain will compete.
Fischer's lawyers noted that chess carries worldwide prestige and his participation would serve the best interests of the United States.
“Wouldn't it be a fantastic American victory should he carry all the marbles home from Cuba?” asked the lawyers in a letter to State.
State agreed it certainly would be but stuck by a 1961 ruling limiting Cuban travel to journalists, businessmen with Cuban interests and relatives of critically ill Cubans.
Fischer's argument that he was a journalist since he would cover the tournament for Chess Life and Saturday Review was disallowed by State.

U.S. Checks Chess Champion

The Leader-Post Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada Wednesday, August 04, 1965 - Page 12

No trip for chess champion
New York (AP)—A lawyer for Bobby Fischer, 22-year-old United States chess champion, said he knows of no “political” reason why the U.S. state department refused Fischer permission to play in an international tournament in Cuba.
The lawyer, Andrew P. Davis, commenting on a report that Fischer was turned down by the passport office for travel to Cuba, said a letter dated July 27 reads:
“He (Fischer) does not fall within the department's established criteria.”
The tournament in Havana is scheduled for Aug. 25.
Davis said Fischer's request for travel documents was accompanied by letters of credentials from the magazines Saturday Review and Chess Life, which Fischer planned to represent.

ONLY THREE GROUPS
A department spokesman said Monday regulations allow only the following three classes of Americans to travel to Cuba: 1, Bona fide journalists; 2, Businessmen with long-standing interests in Cuba; 3. Persons on humanitarian missions, such as relatives of prisoners or Cubans who are ill.
The department spokesman said Fischer could not be regarded as a legitimate journalist because “his primary purpose is to play chess; any articles he might write would be secondary.”
Fischer was not available for comment.
Chess players have been invited to Havana from Canada, Argentina, Denmark, The Netherlands, Britain, Spain, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia and the Soviet Union.

No trip for chess champion

The Cincinnati Enquirer Cincinnati, Ohio Thursday, August 05, 1965 - Page 9

Chess Champ Denied Visa To Visit Cuba
Washington (UPI)—The state Department said it has refused to permit U. S. chess champion Bobby Fischer to go to Cuba for an international tournament in Havana.
Mr Fischer's attorney, according to department spokesman Marshall Wright, had requested on behalf of the 22-year-old champion that he be permitted to go to Cuba as a participant in the tournament, beginning August 22, and “as an accredited news representative.”
Mr. Wright said Mr. Fischer's request was denied because it was found that the primary purpose of his trip would be to play in the tournament. He could not qualify as a full-time working newsman since any articles he might write would be secondary and incidental to the main purpose of his journey.
Mr. Wright pointed out that the department has only three categories of exemptions from its ban on travel to Cuba — working newsmen, those making the trip for “humanitarian reasons” and businessmen with long-standing interests in Cuba whose presence there is necessary.

Chess Champ Denied Visa To Visit Cuba

The Fresno Bee The Republican Fresno, California Friday, August 06, 1965 - Page 43

Chess Player Ban
In vast reaches of the world sphere American national policies are not ecstatically embraced and enthusiasm for American culture is not widely shared, the name and skill of Bobby Fischer mean more than those of, say, McGeorge Bundy or Willie Mays.
Bobby Fischer, at 22, is a grand master of chess, the best we've got, and consequently a very valuable cultural export. Because of that, we consider the state department to be shortsighted and stupid in refusing him the passport endorsement he applied for in order to go to Havana this month for an international invitational chess tournament.
To the tournament, honoring the memory of the great Cuban master, Jose Capablanca, players have been invited from Argentina, Britain, Canada, Denmark, the Netherlands, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia and the Soviet Union. Fischer is forbidden permission to go because he does not fall within the state department's “established criteria” for travelers to Cuba; he is not on a humanitarian mission, he is not a businessman with long standing Cuban interests, and he is not, says the department, a bona fide journalist, even though he has credentials to represent the Saturday Review, and Chess Life.
The state department's over-bearing rigidity in refusing to get down its validation stamp and let this young man go after a chess prize, which, if be won it would do mere for us than several hundred hours of Voice of America broadcasting, is disheartening.
If the functionaries who turned Fischer down do not understand the prestige to be gained by sending the United States chess champion to Havana, they shouldn't he handling this country's foreign relations. Perhaps they should move over into agriculture or the bureau of the mint where incompetence is not so conspicuous or harmful.

Chess Player Ban

St. Louis Post-Dispatch St. Louis, Missouri Saturday, August 07, 1965 - Page 4

A Brilliant Defensive Move
The State Department will not let Bobby Fischer, the American chess champion, go to Cuba to play in the Capablanca Memorial Tournament. We try hard, if somewhat unsuccessfully, to appreciate the department's solicitude for Americans prone to rush in where even angels fear to tread. But why fear for our somewhat idiosyncratic Grand Master? Hasn't he taken care of himself in many a tournament?
The department's ever available spokesman explained that Fischer “does not fall within the department's criteria.” While journalists may cover the tournament and Mr. Fischer is a correspondent of Chess Life, it seems, in the eyes of the department, that does not make him a bona fide journalist.
The ways of diplomacy may be devious, but they are not always unfathomable. Clearly the State Department, considering its many difficulties, does not want to add to anti-American resentments by having young Mr. Fischer humble the chess masters of the world. A devious but brilliant bit of diplomacy, even if it may go unrecognized.

A Brilliant Defensive Move

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Arizona Daily Star Tucson, Arizona Sunday, August 08, 1965 - Page 2

Chess Champ Will Play Cuba Tourney By Phone
New York — Barred from traveling to Cuba for an international chess tourney, 22-year-old United States champion Bobby Fischer has arranged to participate by telephone.
The young grand master from Brooklyn had unsuccessfully sought the State Department's permission to go to Havana Aug. 25 for the Capablanca Memorial Tournament.
The department rejected his application, explaining that current regulations allow only three classes of Americans to travel to Cuba: journalists, businessmen with long-standing interests there, and persons on humanitarian interests.

Fischer's lawyer, Andrew P. Davis, argued — to no avail —that the champion is qualified as a journalist, since he had been assigned to cover the tournament for two magazines, the Saturday Review and Chess Life.
When Fischer's story appeared in the New York Times last week, Moses Eskolski, a New York chess enthusiast, called Davis to suggest the telephone arrangement.
The lawyer was taken with the idea and promptly passed along the suggestion by cable to the man in charge of the tournament, Jose Luis Barreras Merino of Cuba's National Institute of Sports, Physical Education and Recreation.
Barreras promptly agreed in principle to Fischer's participation by telephone, noting that this would lend added interest to the event among chess fans around the world.
Players have been invited to the Capablanca tournament from Argentina, Canada, Denmark, Holland, England and Spain, as well as from several East European countries where chess skill carries special prestige: Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia.
Participants are to receive living and travel expenses and will compete for cash prizes, including a $2,000 first prize.

After the tournament officials agreed to let Fischer play matches by telephone, Davis asked the State Department again to let him go in person. The reply, in effect, was: We cannot stop a telephone call, but we will not reconsider our ruling on Fischer's travel request. There are at present no restrictions on telephone calls between the U.S. and Cuba.

Chess Champ Will Play Cuba Tourney By Phone

Star Tribune Minneapolis, Minnesota Sunday, August 08, 1965 - Page 40

Silly Chess
THE CHESS champion of the United States, Bobby Fischer, now seems to have become a pawn in the “game” of world politics.
Our State Department is denying him a passport to Cuba to take part in Havana's Capablanca Memorial Tournament, along with other players from throughout the world.
Let chess buffs who had thought it impossible for anyone to checkmate himself consider this latest, self-defeating move by our State Department.

Silly Chess

Chippewa Herald-Telegram Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin Monday, August 09, 1965 - Page 2

Chess Playing Will Kill Cuba
At times our great country gets so tangled in our own causes that we lose sight of the real importance of things.
It seems that Bobby Fischer, chess champion of the U.S.A., wanted to play in an international chess match. Now, The Herald-Telegram reader would ask, what on earth could he wrong, political or any other way with an innocent chess match?
Well, the stumbling block comes when the U.S. State Department learned that the match that Fischer wanted to attend was to be held in Cuba—A Communist country to which we allow no travel except by legitimate journalists.
Fischer, who has a publicized and dramatic temper, held his temper for once. “I am a journalist,” he said “I write for the Saturday Review of Literature and Chess Life.” Yet, to the strict line, red tape riddled, State Department, this was not a bona fide journalist's position. Fischer, they said, could not go.
How bad can the thinking of the country be? Fischer, and any American, should be allowed to go any-where if they want to. Certainly, they should be told that in certain countries our State Department cannot protect them, but if they want to go anyway, they should not be stopped—especially to play the great political anti-American war game of chess.
We allow our citizens to travel to Russia, to East Berlin, to Red China if they can get in. It is part of their freedom to be able to go. Saying they cannot, as we are doing with Cuba will not make Castro's island dry up and blow into the Atlantic, the foggy feelings of State not withstanding.
If freedom is going to be abridged, let not our freedom loving country do it. Let's leave that to Russia, Red China, and Cuba.

Chess Playing Will Kill Cuba

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Somerset Daily American Somerset, Pennsylvania Monday, August 09, 1965 - Page 5

Chess King Fischer Will Use Phones
By Raleigh Allsbrook
New York (AP) — U.S. chess champion Bobby Fischer, who can't get government permission to go to Cuba for an international tournament, will participate anyway — by telephone.
The State Department rejected his travel bid on grounds he didn't meet any of the classifications for Americans allowed to visit Cuba.
His attorney, Andrew P. Davis, then took a chess enthusiast's suggestion and proposed the play-by-phone idea to the 22 year old champion.

Interesting Idea
“Sure, I would be willing,” said Fischer. “It's an interesting idea. Let's see if we can do it.” So Davis talked with officials of the Capablanca Memorial Tournament in Havana and they agreed.
The tournament runs from Aug 25 to Sept. 25 and Fischer will make his moves at the Marshall Chess club in New York. A referee will watch his play.
“If some sort of a Teletype arrangement seems better than the telephone, we may use that,” Davis explained.
Chess is a deliberate game and it is not unusual for players to carry on long distance games by mail, telegraph, phone or other means.

Effect On Game
The attorney said he was uncertain what effect it would have on the young man's game.
“Some say both players will have the same advantages and disadvantages,” he commented. “My opinion though is that he may he hurt a little. He has a very thoughtful demeanor. Some little thing could tip the board.” Players from the United States, Argentina, Canada, Denmark, England, Spain, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Yugoslavia and the Soviet Union have been invited to the tournament.
In turning down Fischer, the State Department said only journalists, businessmen with long-standing interests there and persons on humanitarian missions were eligible to visit Cuba.
The play-by-phone idea was considered a private matter over which the department had no authority, Davis declared.
He said he wanted to emphasize that neither he nor Fischer had any desire to violate government regulations.
Fischer was 14 when he first won the U.S. title. He now lives in Brooklyn and spends most of his time playing and writing about chess.
Davis argued unsuccessfully that he should he admitted as a journalist.

Chess King Fischer Will Use Phones

Detroit Free Press Detroit, Michigan Monday, August 09, 1965 - Page 8

Chess Champ Checkmates U.S.
Bobby Fischer put the U.S. Government in check Sunday by agreeing to participate in a Cuban chess tournament by telephone.
This ploy was necessitated when the State Department denied the 22-year-old grand master a passport to visit Cuba. State ruled that Fischer did not qualify as a working journalist, even though he had been assigned to cover the tournament by two magazines.
Fischer turned to the phone idea after it was suggested by a New York chess enthusiast.
“Sure, I would be willing,” he said. “It's an interesting idea. Let's see if we can do it.”
Tournament sponsors are also agreeable. But Fischer's attorney was afraid the phone competition might put Fischer off his game.
The State Department indicated they would not stop telephone calls to Cuba. But they were also insistent that their previous ruling on travel would not be reviewed.

Chess Champ Checkmates U.S.

The Des Moines Register Des Moines, Iowa Tuesday, August 10, 1965 - Page 4

Iron Curtain Bureaucracy
The State Department has denied Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, a passport authorization to travel to Cuba to play in the Capablanca Memorial Tournament in Havana. An official of the department said that Fischer “does not fall within the department's established criteria.”
How utterly stupid and how typically bureaucratic. This action and the reason for it sound exactly like Moscow.
What harm could Bobby Fischer do to the United States by traveling to Cuba and playing in a chess tournament with players from many other countries? Of course he might display his temperament and complain about the rules or refuse to play. But he does that sort of thing frequently anyway—and if he did it in Cuba, the United States probably could survive the shock.
The State Department bars teachers, students, artists and most other Americans from going to Cuba and learning something about the place and Fidel Castro's regime. It does allow accredited journalists to travel there, but even though Fischer was accredited to write pieces for the Saturday Review and Chess Life, he was ruled out—apparently because he is only a part-time journalist.
This Iron Curtain philosophy of the State Department with regard to Cuba does not serve the security of the United States well. It only makes this free and powerful nation look timid. It prevents the human contacts with Cubans which are so vital to understanding—both American under-standing of the Cuban regime and Cuban understanding of the American people.

Iron Curtain Bureaucracy

The Baltimore Sun Baltimore, Maryland Tuesday, August 10, 1965 - Page 14

Checkmate
The State Department would be in a better position to administer its regulations limiting travel to Cuba by United States citizens if it would make intelligent exceptions to them. The case of Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, is an example. The young Mr. Fischer was denied official permission to go to Cuba to take part in an international chess tournament because he didn't fit into any of the categories of Americans who, under the official regulations, may be allowed to go there. Journalists, business men with long standing interests in Cuba and persons on humanitarian missions are eligible under the regulations; Mr. Fischer writes about chess and his attorney suggested, without success, that he might thus qualify for the journalist category. It is reported that Mr. Fischer will take part in the tournament by telephone, but this will satisfy neither the chess experts nor the American onlookers who dislike seeing their Government entangled in its own red tape.

Checkmate

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Times Colonist Victoria, British Columbia, Canada Tuesday, August 10, 1965 - Page 5

Castro Plays Smart To Checkmate U.S.
NEW YORK (AP) — Refusal of the United States government to allow chess champion Bobby Fischer to go to Cuba for an international tournament is viewed by Prime Minister Fidel Castro as “a propagandistic victory for Cuba.” dispatches from Havana say. Castro is “delighted” by the government's refusal and has taken personal charge of arranging for Fischer's participation by telephone from New York. The U.S. state department, in rejecting an application from the 22-year-old chess champion to travel to Cuba, said permission is granted only to journalists, businessmen with long-standing interests in Cuba and persons on humanitarian missions. A Havana source said Castro decided to pay the heavy expenses necessary to maintain open telephone and telegraph lines eight hours daily during the month-long tournament, which begins Aug. 25. According to Cuban officials, Fischer will dictate plays to an international referee in New York who will transmit them by an open telephone line to Havana. Plays by his opponents will be relayed the same way.

Castro Plays Smart To Checkmate U.S.

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The South Bend Tribune South Bend, Indiana Tuesday, August 10, 1965 - Page 5

Chess Player To Compete Via Telephone
Havana (UPI) — Bobby Fischer of New York City will compete in the Capablanca Memorial Chess Tournament here by telephone, the president of the Cuban Chess Federation confirmed yesterday.
Fischer was denied permission to visit Havana for the tournament, which will open Aug. 22. Official U.S. policy restricts to a narrow group the number of Americans who can be granted visas to visit Communist Cuba.
Jose Luis Barreras, head of the Cuban Chess Federation, said contracts had been signed to provide a direct telephone line between Havana and New York for Fischer.

Chess Player To Compete Via Telephone

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The Central New Jersey Home News New Brunswick, New Jersey Tuesday, August 10, 1965 - Page 10

Fischer Impasse Delights Fidel
New York (AP) — The refusal of the U.S. government to allow chess champion Bobby Fischer to go to Cuba for an international tournament is being viewed by Prime Minister Fidel Castro as “a propaganda victory for Cuba.”
Dispatches from Havana said Castro is “delighted” by the government's refusal and has taken personal charge of arranging for Fischer's participation by telephone from New York.
The U.S. State Department rejected an application from the 22-year-old chess champion to travel to the Communist island. It said permission is granted only to journalists, businessmen with longstanding interests in Cuba and persons on humanitarian missions.
An Havana source said Castro decided to pay the heavy expenses necessary to maintain open telephone and telegraph lines eight hours daily during the month-long tournament, which begins Aug. 25.
Castro is reported to view the occasion as a publicity windfall for Cuba that “would serve to call attention to the unfairness of the American blockade of Cuba.”
Participants this year will come from the Soviet Union, Bulgaria. West Germany, Sweden, Canada, Czechoslovakia, Poland, Yugoslavia and other countries.
According to Cuban officials, Fischer will dictate plays to an international referee in New York who will transmit them by an open telephone line to Havana. Plays by his opponents will be relayed the same way.

Fischer Impasse Delights Fidel

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Tuesday, August 10, 1965 - Page 8

Chess by Long-Distance
The State Department's refusal to permit the U.S. chess champion, Bobby Fischer, to go to Cuba to play in an international tournament serves no purpose but to make this country look vacuous and self-conscious.
It isn't going to keep the 22-year-old champ out of the competition. He is going to participate by telephone, thus publicizing and emphasizing the fatuity of the State Department's attempts to control the international movements of its citizens.
We think it would be a good idea for more Americans to see Cuba and for more Cubans to see the U.S. The contrast inevitably works in our favor. Why would we be afraid to expose U.S. citizens to the Castro culture if they are willing to take any risks involved?

Chess by Long-Distance

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The Record Hackensack, New Jersey Tuesday, August 10, 1965 - Page 26 ()

Student Travel To Cuba Has Been Halted
Washington (CDN) — The United States Government, in a little-noticed victory for its Cuban policy, appears to have halted travel by U. S. student groups to the Communist island.
Fifty-eight students traveled to Cuba in defiance of State Department restrictions. They gave a propaganda boost for Fidel Castro, freely issuing pro-Cuba statements while on the island and after their return to this country.

FOUR REASONS

There appear to be four possible reasons why student travel to Cuba has stopped:
1. Eleven persons have been indicted, two of them twice, in connection with the 1963 and 1964 trips.
2. The Supreme Court handed down a decision this spring supporting U. S. restrictions on Cuban travel.
3. Cuba is short of money and may have decided to cut costs by not paying the bills for the students this year.
4. The Progressive Labor Movement, a pro-Peking Communist organization, which spearheaded the two Cuba trips, seems to have turned most of its attention to other subjects.
There are two indictments pending in the travel cases, one naming four persons for conspiring to organize the 1963 trip, and another naming nine in connection with the 1964 visit.

TRIAL IN FALL

Lee Levi Laub and Phillip Abbott Luce, both of New York and both associated with the Progressive Labor Movement, were named in both indictments.
The cases are expected to come to trial in the U. S. District Court in Brooklyn, N. Y., in October or November. The defendants face maximum penalties of 5 years in prison or $10,000 fines.
Legal observers think that the Government's case has been significantly strengthened by a decision handed down by the Supreme Court last May 3.
In a lawsuit brought by Louis Zemmel of Middlefield, Conn., the court ruled 6 to 3 that the State Department could constitutionally refuse to issue a visa for travel to Cuba.
Zemmel was not associated with the student groups and never traveled to Cuba. He brought suit when the State Department refused to give him a visa to go.
A U. S. passport is not sufficient for travel to Cuba. A visa is also required—a special stamp which the State Department has issued to few people other than newsmen. The Department recently, for example, refused to issue a visa for U. S. chess champion Bobby Fischer to play in a tournament in Havana.
The students flew to Cuba by way of eastern Europe, on tickets estimated to have cost several hundred dollars each round trip. Perhaps, observers here suggest, Castro decided that the students weren't worth the money this year.

Student Travel To Cuba Has Been Halted

Detroit Free Press Detroit, Michigan Wednesday, August 11, 1965 - Page 6

Checkmated?
The Ways of the cold war are wondrous indeed. Take the case of Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, as an example.
Fischer applied to the State Department for permission to go to Havana this month for an international chess tournament, which seems simple enough.
But we're not speaking to Cuba these days, and the State Department has ruled that only journalists, business men with long-standing interests and persons on humanitarian missions can go.
Though Fischer is an accredited writer for a chess magazine and promised to do some articles, he isn't a full-time journalist. State said. Neither is chess a “business” as such, nor playing in a tournament a humanitarian mission. So Fischer can't go.
So Bobby Fischer, our champion, is going to compete by telephone from New York, with a referee watching on.
That way, of course, he can't give away any military secrets — which he doesn't know anyway. The nation will be safe. So there to you. Fidel Castro. Our mighty policy giants have triumphed again.

Checkmated?

The News Journal Wilmington, Delaware Wednesday, August 11, 1965 - Page 22

Not 'Within the Criteria'
Why Can't Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, go to Cuba to compete in the Capablanca Memorial Tournament against players from many other countries?
Because the State Department says he can't. In denying him a passport, the department has explained that “he does not fall within the department's established criteria.”
More's the pity. Bobby Fischer is one of the few people in this country who stands a chance of beating the Russians at the game they call their own. It seems as if the State Department is passing up a chance to score a few points at the expense of the Communists by not taking the risk that Mr. Fischer's renowned temper will get him into trouble.
Aside from that, Mr. Fischer holds credentials as a writer from two magazines—Saturday Review and Chess Life. Accredited journalists have always been allowed to go to Cuba, and the State Department has not always been so choosy about the credentials—as witness the case of a Wilmington-area social worker who was permitted to go a few years ago after he succeeded in getting credentials from a small Philadelphia publication.
But in breaking its own rule, the State Department declared that a journalist can't just be a journalist. He has to be a “bona fide journalist.”
This may not be the ultimate absurdity in the State Department's passport policy vis-a-vis Cuba, but it is pretty close to it. The State Department should reexamine the case. As matters now stand, the country stands to lose more than it gains from this strict application of policy.

Not 'Within the Criteria'

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Wilkes-Barre Times Leader, The Evening News Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania Thursday, August 12, 1965 - Page 11

Chess Champ Withdraws From Play
Objects To Castro's Remarks Claiming A Propaganda Victory
New York, Aug. 12 — (AP) — Bobby Fischer. the U. S. chess champion, says he will not participate in a Cuban tournament if Premier Fidel Castro seeks to win a propaganda victory from it.
The State Department refused Fischer permission to go to Havana for the tournament, but he has made plans to take part by telephone or teletype.
On learning yesterday, however, that the Cuban Premier viewed the State Department action as a “propagandistic victory for Cuba,” the 22-year-old champion cabled Castro:
“I object to your statements reported in the New York Times today claiming ‘propagandistic victory’ and hereby withdraw from Capablanca Tournament.
“I shall re-enter tournament only if you send immediate cable assuring me that you and your government seek and claim no political benefit from my participation and that no further political comments will issue from you concerning my participation.”
Dispatches from Havana pictured Castro as being delighted by the State Department action and said he had taken personal charge of arranging Fischer's participation by phone or teletype.
The State Department said Fischer did not come within any of the classifications for U. S. citizens permitted to travel to Cuba.

Chess Champ Withdraws From Play

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Des Moines Tribune Des Moines, Iowa Thursday, August 12, 1965 - Page 13

Chess King Rips Castro
New York, N.Y. — Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, has made it clear that he does not intend to be used by Premier Fidel Castro as a pawn in a propaganda contest. The 22-year-old chess wizard has sent a cable to Premier Castro saying he is with-drawing from the Capablanca Inter-national Tournament in Havana unless the premier disavows a statement attributed to him. It had been reported on Tuesday that the premier regarded the United States refusal to allow Fischer to go to Havana as “a propagandistic victory for Cuba.”

“Object”
Fischer cabled his withdrawal after agreeing to participate in the tournament by telephone, teletype or cable. The tournament begins on Aug. 25. In his cable, Fischer said: “I object to your statements reported in the New York Times claiming ‘propagandistic victory’ and hereby with-draw from Capablanca tournament.
I shall re-enter tournament only if you send immediate cable assuring me that you and your government seek and claim no political benefit from my participation and that no further political comments will issue from you concerning my participation.

“Astonished”
Fischer's lawyer, Andrew P. Davis. said his client was astonished to learn that Premier Castro was using the situation for anti-American propaganda. The U. S. Department of State has refused a visa to Fischer to go to Cuba for the tournament on the ground that he is neither a business-man with long-standing interest in the Communist island, a bona fide journalist or on a humanitarian mission.

Chess King Rips Castro

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The Orlando Sentinel Orlando, Florida Thursday, August 12, 1965 - Page 61

Chess Champ Angry With Fidel's Move
New York—Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, made it clear Wednesday he did not intend to be used by Premier Fidel Castro as a pawn in a propaganda contest.
The 22-year-old chess wizard sent a cable to Premier Castro saying he was withdrawing from the Capablanca International Tournament in Havana unless the premier disavows a statement attributed to him.

IT HAS BEEN reported Tuesday the premier regarded the United States’ refusal to allow Fischer to go to Havana as “a propagandistic victory for Cuba.”
Fischer cabled his withdrawal Wednesday afternoon, when it seemed certain he would participate in the tournament by telephone, teletype or cable. The tournament begins on Aug. 25.
In his cable, Fischer said:

“I OBJECT to your statements reported in The New York Times today claiming ‘propagandistic victory’ and hereby withdraw from Capablanca Tournament.
“I shall re-enter tournament only if you send immediate cable assuring me that you and your government seek and claim no political benefit from my participation and that no further political comments will issue from you concerning my participation.”
Fischer's lawyer, Andrew P. Davis, said his client was astonished to learn that Premier Castro was using the situation for anti-American propaganda.
The U.S. Department of State has refused a visa to Fischer to go to Cuba for the tournament on the ground that he is neither a businessman with long-standing interest in the Communist island, a bona fide journalist or on a humanitarian mission.

Chess Champ Angry With Fidel's Move

The Berkshire Eagle Pittsfield, Massachusetts Thursday, August 12, 1965 - Page 2

Fischer Refuses Castro's Gambit In Chess Tourney
New York — Bobby Fischer, youthful United States chess champion, yesterday said he will not participate in the Capablanca international chess tournament in Havana unless Cuban Premier Fidel Castro retracts claims of a “propagandistic victory.”
The State Department had refused Fischer a visa for travel to the tournament on the grounds he was not a bona fide journalist or businessman with interests there. It had then been expected that Fischer would play by telephone or wire, and Castro made his claim of a propaganda coup over the United States.
Fischer sent a telegram to Castro yesterday announcing his withdrawal.
“I shall re-enter tournament only if you send immediate cable assuring me that you and your government seek and claim no political benefit from my participation and that no further political comments will issue from you concerning my participation.”

Fischer Refuses Castro's Gambit In Chess Tourney

The Fresno Bee The Republican Fresno, California Thursday, August 12, 1965 - Page 48

State Goofed
The United States Department of State thought it had checkmated young Bobby Fischer, America's chess champion and infant terrible is international chess, when it refused him a visa to visit Cuba and participate in a big chess competition there. However, state had not reckoned with Fischer's instinctive reflex actions. All right, he would accept the edict by state, he said, but there was nothing to prevent him from participating by telephone, and so he will participate—by telephone. Thus he left the department of state as vulnerable as a pawn facing a free moving knight, so far as international criticism over its petty attitude is concerned. Fischer so outmaneuvered state it was not even in the game.

State Goofed

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The Lincoln Star Lincoln, Nebraska Friday, August 13, 1965 - Page 10

Castro: No Political Hay Over Chess Meet
New York (AP) — Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro said Thursday he was above trying to make international political hay out of a dispute over whether the U.S. chess champion should go to Havana for a tournament.
“Our country has no need for such fleeting propaganda,” Castro said in a cable-gram to Bobby Fischer, 22, U.S. chess king.
Instead, the Cuban prime minister suggested that perhaps the American champion feared losing and had fabricated an excuse to avoid the competition.
“If you have become frightened or regretful of your initial decision (to play by telephone) it would be better for you to contrive another pretext and have the courage to be honest,” he said.

The international squabble began last month when the U.S. State Department refused permission for Fischer to enter Cuba for the Capablanca Memorial Chess Tournament in Havana on the grounds he did not meet the qualifications set by the department for travel to Cuba.
Fischer then agreed to play in the tourney by telephone with his, and his opponents moves, relayed to and from Havana by telephone.
Last week, however, reliable sources in Havana were quoted as saying the Cuban prime minister viewed the State Department refusal as “a propagandistic victory for Cuba.”
On hearing of the reports, Fischer sent Castro a cable-gram Wednesday withdrawing from the competition saying he objected to statements attributed to Castro.

Castro: No Political Hay Over Chess Meet

The Miami News Miami, Florida Friday, August 13, 1965 - Page 12

Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro
Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro said Thursday he was above trying to make international political hay out of a dispute over whether the U.S. chess champion should go to Havana for a tournament. “Our country has no need for such fleeting propaganda,” Castro said in a cable-gram to Bobby Fischer, 22, U.S. chess king. The international squabble began last month when the U.S. State Department refused permission for Fischer to enter Cuba for the Capablanca Memorial Chess Tournament in Havana

Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro

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The Central New Jersey Home News New Brunswick, New Jersey Friday, August 13, 1965 - Page 16

Castro Cables Chess Champ Denying Propaganda Motives
New York (AP) — Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro has sent a cable to U.S. chess champion Bobby Fischer denying that Cuba is seeking a propaganda advantage from Fischer's possible long-distance participation in an international tournament in Havana.
A spokesman for the 22-year-old champion said he was out of town and unreachable when the cable arrived yesterday, but he added:

Opens Door

“I believe this opens the door for Bobby to participate by telephone in the tournament.”
Fischer, denied permission by the U.S. State Department to visit the Communist island, had offered to play by telephone.
But Fischer then heard of reports from reliable sources in Havana that Castro viewed the State Department action as a “Propagandistic victory for Cuba.”
Fischer sent a cablegram to Castro Wednesday in which he withdrew from the tournament and added: “I shall re-enter the tournament only if you send immediate cable assuring me that you and your government seek and claim no political benefit from my participation and that no further political comments will issue from you concerning my participation.”

Denies Need

Castro said in his reply that “Our country has no need for such fleeting propaganda,” and added:
“If you have become frightened or regretful of your initial decision (to play by telephone or teletype) it would be better for you to contrive another pretext and have the courage to be honest.”
Castro denied in the cable-gram that he ever had made any comment on the State Department action, and also told Fischer:
“I am surprised you attribute to me some type of statement referring to your participation in the tournament. In this respect I have not said nor spoken a single word with anyone.”
Fischer, a Brooklyn resident, sought State Department permission last month to go to Cuba for the Capablanca Memorial Chess Tournament scheduled for Aug. 25 to Sept. 25.
The State Department said Fischer was not in any of the three categories of Americans allowed to go to Cuba. These are journalists, businessmen with longstanding connections in Cuba and persons on humanitarian missions.

Castro Cables Chess Champ Denying Propaganda Motives

The Minneapolis Star Minneapolis, Minnesota Monday, August 16, 1965 - Page 4

A Nonsensical Chess Gambit
THE MOVES in the international chess game involving the U.S. champion and Fidel Castro are the kind that would classify as amusing if they weren't so pathetic.
First our State Department said our chess champion, Bobby Fischer, couldn't go to Cuba to take part (along with other experts from around the world) in a tournament in Havana.
Then Bobby said he would play in the tourney by telephone or cable. But he read a report that Cuba's premier had called the U.S. refusal to let him go to Havana as “a propagandistic victory for Cuba.” So Bobby cabled Castro saying he was withdrawing.
And now Castro has denied making such a statement. A spokesman for Bobby says this opens the door for the champ to take part in the event, by telephone.
What's the next move? It ought to be one by the State Department, to end the type of nonsense which started this whole thing. But State probably has “castled” and won't be budged.

A Nonsensical Chess Gambit

Sioux City Journal Sioux City, Iowa Wednesday, August 18, 1965 - Page 4

Press Comment

Game of Kings
Lincoln Star: The game of chess might be described as the game of thinkers or the game of kings. The U.S. chess champion is 22-year-old Bobby Fischer who will participate in the international tournament in Cuba. Denied a travel permit by the U.S State Department, Fischer will transmit his moves to Havana from New York City by telephone or cable. The plan might work pretty well since it will allow both Fischer and his foe ample opportunity to study their own and each other's moves. It might well be called the game of kings since the average person would find it hard to get the time for it in view of the long concentration required for every move.

Press Comment: Game of Kings

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Green Bay Press-Gazette Green Bay, Wisconsin Friday, August 20, 1965 - Page 4

Checkmate for Chess Player
The Department of State was up-held in the courts a couple of months ago in its insistence that it could ban travel of Americans to Cuba as not in the nation's interest. Now it appears that it is stuck with the decision.
United States chess champion Bobby Fischer requested permission to visit Cuba to play in the Capablanca Memorial Tournament, an international chess affair to be held in Havana later this month. Since the State Department does bend its ban to permit journalists or businessmen who had business interests in Cuba previous to Castro's take-over to travel, Fischer also had contracts with a couple of American magazines for articles on the trip. But the State Department turned thumbs down and said the articles were only by-products of his visit.
Obviously the State Department would like to pretend that nothing goes on in Cuba like chess tournaments. But Fischer is getting around the restriction at least in part by making arrangements to take part in the tournament by phone or cable, not under State's jurisdiction. Since there was no question of Fischer's sympathy to either Castro or communism, the whole affair has made the State Department look pretty silly.
We've agreed with the administration's insistence that different Communist countries require different treatment, depending upon their current aims and attitudes. But it makes little sense that Americans are not permitted to visit Cuba while they can trade on a limited scale with Eastern European satellites, our government authorities are in constant conference with Red Chinese delegates and we sell wheat to Russia.
Fischer was turned down most likely because the Department of State couldn't very well let him go when the court case which upheld its right to restrict involved another American who merely wanted to see what was going on.
The incident has also enabled Castro to get into the act to try to make some political headway. Hearing that Castro has commented disparagingly on the State Department, an alarmed Fischer sent Fidel a cable announcing his withdrawal from the tournament unless Castro would “send me immediate cable assuring me that you and your government seek and claim no political benefit from my participation.” Castro did not do exactly that but he did wire Fischer that he never said anything in the first place.
This is all nit picking. The Department of State ought to be some-what more dignified than to he concerned with whether an American whose patriotism is not questioned goes to Havana to play chess.

Checkmate for Chess Player

The Gazette Montreal, Quebec, Canada Saturday, August 21, 1965 - Page 15

Chess King No Pawn
Bobby Fischer, the USA chess champion, does not intend to be used by Premier Castro of Cuba as a pawn in a propaganda contest. He sent a cable to the Premier saying he was withdrawing from the Capablanca Memorial international tourney in Havana unless he disavowed a statement attributed to him.
It was reported that the Premier had discerned “a propagandistic victory for Cuba” in the USA State Department's refusal to allow Fischer to go to Havana. It had been expected that Fischer would participate by telephone, teletype or cable in the tournament, which begins August 25. In his cable to Premier Castro, Fischer said:
“I object to your statements reported in The New Your Times today claiming ‘propagandistic victory’ and hereby withdraw from the Capablanca tournament.
I shall re-enter tournament only if you send immediate cable assuring me that you and your Government seek and claim no political benefit from my participation and that no further political comments will issue from you concerning my participation.”
The State Department refused a visa to Fischer on the ground that he is neither a businessman with long-standing interest in the Communist island, nor a bona fide journalist, nor is on a humanitarian mission.

August 21, 1965 Game of Kings by D.M. Le Dain Gazette, Montreal Canada

Great Falls Tribune Great Falls, Montana Sunday, August 22, 1965 - Page 37

Youthful Chess Master
Youthful Chess Master Bobby Fischer, the young chess grand master who was recently checkmated by the State Department when he wanted to play in Cuba, is the subject of a biography, “Profile of a Prodigy,” by Frank Brady, published by McKay. The author is editor of Chess World and a tournament player himself. The study includes annotations of 75 of Fischer's most important games.

Youthful Chess Master

Star Tribune Minneapolis, Minnesota Sunday, August 22, 1965 - Page 28

Checkmate: Fischer Will Participate in Capablanca Memorial Tournament
CHECKMATE - Bobby Fischer, 22, the American chess grandmaster, announced at New York, he will participate in the Capablanca Memorial Tournament in Havana, Cuba, by telegraph. He refused a visa by the State Department to Cuba for the match, which begins Wednesday.

Checkmate

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Arizona Daily Star Tucson, Arizona Sunday, August 22, 1965 - Page 5

Fischer Will Play In Cuban Chess Match
New York — Bobby Fischer, the 22-year-old American chess grandmaster, announced Saturday that he would participate by telegraph in the Capablanca memorial tournament in Havana.
Fischer was refused a visa by the State Department to go to Cuba for the match, which begins Wednesday. Subsequently, Cuban Premier Fidel Castro was reported to have said that the State Department's action was a “propagandistic victory” for his country.
On Aug. 12, in protest over the premier's alleged remark, Fischer announced that he had withdrawn from the tournament. The next day, however, Castro replied to Fischer's protest and said he had been misquoted.
According to Andrew P. Davis, the moody grandmaster's lawyer, Fischer decided on Friday that this was an acceptable reply and decided to play if arrangements could be made. The arrangements were completed Saturday.
Fischer will play the first of his 21 matches in the international tournament on Wednesday at the Marshall Chess Club, 23 W. 10th St. His moves, and those of his opponent in Cuba, will be exchanged by telegraph. The tournament, which includes many of the world's top players, ends on Sept. 25.

Fischer Will Play In Cuban Chess Match

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The Press-Tribune Roseville, California Tuesday, August 24, 1965 - Page 14

A Paper Curtain Of Our Own
We sneer at the Communists for their iron and bamboo curtains, forgetting we have a paper curtain of our own.
If you have a passport, look at the fine print inside. It tells you what countries you can't visit. If you've used it recently, there's a rubber-stamped notation that you can't go to Cuba, either.
The Supreme Court has recently upheld the State Department's refusal to validate a citizen's passport for travel to Cuba “to make me a better informed citizen.”
In a dissent—which we predict one day will become part of a majority opinion—Justice Douglas delivers himself of some sensible thoughts:
The right to travel, the court has held, is part of the citizen's liberty under the First Amendment. There are areas in which travel may be banned; a raging pestilence could infect not only the traveler but also those with whom lie comes in contact after returning; a theater of war may be too dangerous for travel.
“But the only so-called danger present here is the Communist regime in Cuba. The world, however, is filled with Communist thought … if we are to know them and understand them, we might mingle with them … The First Amendment presupposes a ‘mature people, not afraid of ideas …”
But Justice Douglas is presently in the minority, and the State Department can forbid travel to Cuba. Its most recent and perhaps most ridiculous refusal was in the case of Bobby Fischer, America's best chess player, who was prevented from attempting an international tournament in Havana, presumably because he might be brainwashed.
Fischer has arranged to take part in the tournament by telephone, while his colleagues from nations of all shades of political opinion sit in Havana and meditate upon American timidity. The State Department must at all costs preserve this paper curtain it has erected. We suggest it send out a crew of CIA frog-men to cut the telephone cable out of Miami to keep Fischer and the rest of us oh, so unsullied by any contact with residents of (you should pardon the expression) Cuba.
—Redding Record-Searchlight

A Paper Curtain Of Our Own

The Marshall News Messenger Marshall, Texas Tuesday, August 24, 1965 - Page 4

Stuffy
The bureaucratic stuffiness of the Department of State was plainly revealed in its refusal to permit Bobby Fischer, 22-year-old U S. chess champion, to play in an international chess tournament in Cuba.

“He does not fall within the department's established criteria,” a spokesman for the department said.

The criteria, the spokesman adds, are: (1) A bona fide journalist. (2) a businessman with long-standing interests in Cuba, or 3) persons on humanitarian missions, such as relatives of prisoners or very ill Cubans.

The fact is that the Department of State could, and should, have endorsed Fischer's passport for travel to Cuba without damage to our national interest, the only worthwhile criterion that can he established. Communists and capitalists can be good chess players, but political ideology has nothing whatever to do with the game.

A better argument can be made that our national chess champion could enhance the prestige of the United States by playing and beating the masters of other countries. But no, the Department of State must take refuge in technicalities instead of being prepared to relax its requirements in special cases such as this.

Stuffy

The Record Hackensack, New Jersey Wednesday, August 25, 1965 - Page 44

Chess Champ To Vie By Phone
Miami, Fla. (AP) — The Cuban Government said last night that U.S. chess champion Bobby Fischer has agreed to play in the Cuban chess tournament by telephone.
The announcement, made by Havanna radio, apparently ends a spirited exchange between Fischer and Prime Minister Fidel Castro.
After the U. S. State Department refused Fischer permission to go to Cuba for the tournament, reports circulated in Havanna that Castro considered the move a propaganda victory for Cuba.
Fischer, who had decided to play by phone, then withdrew because he said he didn't want Cuba to make international political hay out of the incident.
Castro replied that he had no need for such fleeting propaganda.
The Government's announcement, monitored in Miami, said that Fischer would be matched against the representative of East Germany. The moves of each will be telephoned between Havanna and New York and corroborated by independent observers on each end.

Chess Champ To Vie By Phone

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The Miami News Miami, Florida Wednesday, August 25, 1965 - Page 10

Chess Game Begins By Telegraph
New York (AP) — United States chess champion Bobby Fischer begins play by telegraph today in an international chess tournament in Cuba.
The decision to play by long distance came after the U.S. State Department refused Fischer permission to go to Cuba for the Casablanca Memorial Tournament in Havana.
When reports circulated in Havana that Communist Premier Fidel Castro viewed the refusal as a propaganda victory for Cuba, Fischer withdrew.
He agreed to play after Castro assured him he had no need for “such fleeting propaganda.”
Fischer, 22. will play a series of games with 22 opponents. His opening opponent will he Heinz Lehmann, West German international grandmaster.

Chess Game Begins By Telegraph

The Pittsburgh Press Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Wednesday, August 25, 1965 - Page 2

Fourth Capablanca Chess Tournament
Technicians have completed installation of telephone equipment for the fourth Capablanca Chess Tournament in Havana, Cuba. Play is scheduled to begin today.
Bobby Fischer, the 22-year-old American Mr. Fischer grand master, will play by telephone from United States.
He had been refused permission to go to Cuba by the U. S. State Department.
Mr. Fischer's first-round opponent will be West German Heinz Lehmann.

Fourth Capablanca Chess Tournament

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The Miami News Miami, Florida Thursday, August 26, 1965 - Page 10

Yank Cables Chess Plays To Havana
New York (AP) — Chess breached the Cuba blockade last night as U.S. champion Bobby Fischer began the first game in an international tournament played by cable between here and Havana.
Fischer's moves in his first match with West Germany's Heinz Lehrmann were relayed by teletype and cable to the $2,000 fourth annual Capablanca memorial tournament in the Havana Libre Hotel.
The arrangement was worked out after the State Department refused to grant Fischer a visa for travel to Cuba.
Fischer, who at 22 is the youngest of chess' international grand masters, will face a total of 22 opponents before the tournament ends Sept. 20.
Blinking under television lights in a back room of the Marshall Chess Club, Fischer made his early moves quickly as his opponent's moves were repeated on his board.
Fischer's moves were written on slips of paper, which were carried to a small office where the teletype machine was set up to relay them by cable.
The teletype operator relayed not only Fischer's moves but the time he took for each move.
Last night's session had a five-hour limit — 2½ hours allotted to each player for 40 moves. Games not completed within the five-hour limit are to be finished at later dates.

Yank Cables Chess Plays To Havana

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The Odessa American Odessa, Texas Thursday, August 26, 1965 - Page 33

Chess Master
CHESS MASTER—Bobby Fischer, 23-year-old American chess master, takes a look at a teletype machine in New York City, which will relay his moves to his opponent — West German grand master Heinz Lehman—in the International Chess Tournament at Havana, Cuba. Fischer, barred from traveling to Cuba, obtained special permission to play the match from the Marshall Chess Club in New York via the teletype (UPI Telephoto)

Chess Master

Daily World Opelousas, Louisiana Thursday, August 26, 1965 - Page 1

Chess Played by Teletype
Getting The Feel of the game, Bobby Fisher, 23 year-old U.S. chess master, fiddles with chessmen at the Marshall Chess Club at New York, prior to his match in the International Chess tournament, being played at Havana, Cuba. The U.S. State Department barred Fischer from traveling to Cuba. Fischer obtained special permission to compete in the tournament by relaying his moves to Cuba via a teletype machine. His opponent is West German grand master Heinz Lehman. — (UPI Facsimile)

Chess Played by Teletype

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The South Bend Tribune South Bend, Indiana Thursday, August 26, 1965 - Page 17

American Wins Chess Match
Havana (UPI)-1I.S. chess master Bobby Fischer, participating by cable in the Capablanca memorial tournament here, defeated West Germany's Heinz Lehmann in a marathon match that ended early today.
Lehmann is the first of 22 opponents expected for Fischer in the tournament.
Experts here said the German player never had a chance of beating Fischer. The 23-year-old American achieved a strong advantage about midway in the 6½-hour game and Lehmann resigned after his 31st move.

American Wins Chess Match

The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Thursday, August 26, 1965 - Page 24 ()

Checkmate
Fidel Castro has provided air cover for a young American to invade Cuba.
When the State Department forbade 22-year-old chess champion Bobby Fischer to go to Havana to compete in a tournament, Castro picked up the tab for a teletype set-up to permit the American to play long-distance from New York.
But there are some problems still facing this country as a result. Will the Central Intelligence Agency keep a close watch on the match to insure that Fischer won't be cheated?
And what will be the State Department's attitude if Fischer wins first prize of $2000 and has to go to Havana to collect? Will the winner get rooked?

Checkmate

Philadelphia Daily News Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Thursday, August 26, 1965 - Page 3

An American Knight “In” Cuba—Barred from traveling to Communist Cuba, 23-year-old American chess master Bobby Fischer takes part in International Chess Tournament in Havana, anyway—via teletype machine. Bobby, in New York City, defeated West Germany's Heinz Lehmann in a marathon match that ended early today.

An American Knight 'In' Cuba

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Star Tribune Minneapolis, Minnesota Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 20

Long-Distance Chess
Bobby Fischer, 22, U.S. chess champion, won his opening match in the fourth Capablanca International Chess Tourney in Havana, Cuba, by making moves relayed via a direct cable line to a New York, N.Y., chess club. The U.S. State Department refused him permission to travel to Cuba.

Long-Distance Chess

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St. Louis Post-Dispatch St. Louis, Missouri Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 24

Fischer Defeats Russian In Cuban Chess Event
Havana, Aug. 27 (UPI)— Bobby Fischer, the American chess “boy wonder,” today defeated Russia's former world champion Vassily Smyslov for his second victory in the Capablanca Memorial Tournament.
The 23-year-old American grandmaster beat the Russian when Smyslov resigned without resuming play. The match had been adjourned last night after 43 moves.
Fischer is competing by cable from New York because the United States Department of State refused to allow him to come to Cuba.

Fischer Defeats Russian In Cuban Chess Event

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The Pittsburgh Press Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 2

Bobby Fischer, the American chess “boy wonder” today defeated Russia's former world champion Vassily Smyslov for his second win in the Capablanca Memorial Tournament in Havana, Cuba. The 23-year-old American grand master beat the Russian when Smyslov resigned without resuming play. The match had been adjourned last night after 43 moves. Fischer is competing by cable from New York, about 1350 miles away, because the State Department refused to allow him to come to Cuba. He defeated West Germany's Heinz Lehmann in a first round match and will “face” his next opponent, Victor Cioaclatea of Romania, on Sunday.

Fischer Defeats Smyslov

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Star-Gazette Elmira, New York Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 27 () ()

Yank Advances In Chess Tourney
Havana, Cuba (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 22-year-old U.S champion, won his opening match in the fourth Capablanca International Chess Tournament but he was far from the scene of the competition.
Fischer, refused permission by the U.S. State Department to make the trip here, made his moves from a chess club in New York Wednesday night and defeated West Germany's international master Heinz Lehmann in 32 moves.
The moves of the two grand masters were relayed via a direct cable line.
Fischer was scheduled to meet former world champion Vassily Smyslov of Russia in the second round Thursday. The result, however, was not expected to be known until today.

Yank Advances In Chess Tourney

Tampa Bay Times St. Petersburg, Florida Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 10

Cable Chess Game Opens
Bobby Fischer, shown above, contemplating a move, the U.S. chess champion, Wednesday began his long distance match by cable with the first of his 22 opponents in Havana.
The match between Fischer, 23, and West German grand master Heinz Lehman, began at 8 p.m., five hours late because of communications trouble. The match was conducted by cable rather than telephone as previously planned.
Fischer, playing from the Marshall Chess Club in Greenwich Village, N.Y., exchanged best wishes by telephone with Lehman at the Havana Libre Hotel before the match began.

Cable Chess Game Opens

The San Francisco Examiner San Francisco, California Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 20

No Pawn of Fate
When fate, personified by the U.S. State Department, decreed that Bobby Fischer, 23, (above) couldn't go to Cuba for the Capablanca Chess Tournament, Fischer set himself up in New York City with a chess board and a teletype linkage to Havana. In this play Wednesday, Fischer beat West German Grand Master Heinz Lehman (r.) who was in Cuba and after six and one half hours of play. Fischer is U.S. chess champion.

No Pawn of Fate

The Orlando Sentinel Orlando, Florida Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 42

Fischer Cops Chess Match
HAVANA, Cuba (AP) Bobby Fischer, 22-year-old U.S. champion, won his opening match in the fourth Capablanca International Chess Tournament but he was far from the scene of the competition.
Fischer, refused permission by the U.S. State Department to make the trip here, made his moves from a chess club in New York Wednesday night and defeated West Germany's international master Heinz Lehmann in 32 moves.
THE MOVES of the two grand masters were relayed via a direct cable line.
Fischer was scheduled to meet former world champion Vasily Smyslov of Russia in the second round Thursday. The result, however, was not expected to he known until Friday.

Fischer Cops Chess Match

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The News-Messenger Fremont, Ohio Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 8

New York-Havana Contest
Bobby Fischer is shown (upper) at his chess board in the Marshall Chess Club in New York and West German grand master Heinz Lehman at his in Havana, where the International Chess Tournament is being played. Since the State Department wouldn't permit Fischer to travel to Cuba, they play by teletype. Fischer is the U.S. senior champion. He won this match, and has 21 more to go.

New York-Havana Contest

Independent Long Beach, California Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 2

Chess Win
U.S. chess master Bobby Fischer defeated West Germany's Heinz Lehmann in a chess match conducted by cable Thursday.
Lehmann, the first of 22 opponents Fischer expects to meet in the Capablanca Memorial Tournament in Havana, resigned after the 23-year-old American achieved a strong advantage. The game lasted six and a half hours.
Fischer cabled his moves from New York. He is participating in the tournament by remote control because the U.S. State Department refused to grant him permission to go to Cuba for the tournament.

Chess Win

Times Colonist Victoria, British Columbia, Canada Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 29

Fischer Wins First Match
Havana (CP)—U.S. chess champion Bobby Fischer defeated Heinz Lehmann, West German international master, in 32 moves Thursday in a first-round match of the Casablanca chess tournament.
Fischer's moves were relayed by teletype and cable from New York because the 22-year-old champion was denied a visa to travel to Cuba by the U.S. state department.
Fischer, youngest of the international grand masters, will face a total of 22 opponents before the tournament ends Sept. 20.
Fischer's moves were written on paper, which was carried to a small office where a teletype machine was set up to relay them by cable. The teletype operator relayed not only Fischer's moves but the time he took for each move. Fischer's opponents' moves also are relayed by teletype.

Fischer Wins First Match

The News Journal Wilmington, Delaware Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 37

Bobby Fischer vs. Vassily Smyslov
A long-distance chess game between U.S. master Bobby Fischer and Russia's former world champion Vassily Smyslov was adjourned last night after 43 moves.
Chess experts in Havana said the 23-year-old American had achieved a probably-decisive advantage over his opponent.
The American “boy wonder” is competing by cable from New York because the State Department refused to allow him to enter Communist Cuba. He defeated West Germany's Heinz Lehmann in a first-round match before taking on Smyslov.

Bobby Fischer vs. Vassily Smyslov

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News-Journal Mansfield, Ohio Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 8

Teletype Tournament — Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn U.S. senior chess champion, contemplates his strategy in New York in the Casablanca Memorial Tournament. The tournament is being played by teletype.

Teletype Tournament

The New York Times New York, New York Saturday, August 28, 1965 - Page 19

Fischer Defeats Smyslov In Chess
Russian Telephones His Resignation From Cuba
When Bobby Fischer, America's 22-year-old chess champion, returned to the Marshall Chess Club in Greenwich Village yesterday, he was expecting to continue his long-distance game with Vassily Smyslov, former world chess champion.
Smyslov, a Russian, is In Havana competing in the Capablanca Memorial Chess Tournament. Fischer is competing in the tournament from New York, exchanging moves with his opponents by Teletype because the State Department refused him permission to go to Cuba.
Smyslov was supposed to send his next move on the Teletype at precisely 10 A.M. yesterday. Instead, the telephone rang. It was the “hot line” of sorts—a direct telephone line between the two players to supplement the Teletype.
On the other end of the line, the Russian spoke to Fischer in English. He was resigning, he said, conceding defeat in the game. He congratulated Fischer on winning, and then the two discussed possible moves that might have been made in the game, which began on Thursday.
The victory put Fischer into the lead in the tournament. Now after two rounds in the 22-round tournament, he is the only one to have scored two victories. Four players are tied with one victory and one draw.

600 Watch In Cuba
The game between Fischer and the 44-year-old Russian had attracted great interest in the Havana Libre Hotel, where the tournament is being held. More than 600 persons were gathered to follow the play on a special chessboard on the wall.
This was not the first meeting between Fischer and Smyslov, who first won the world championship in 1957. During a challengers' tournament in Yugoslavia in 1959, Fischer and Smyslov met four times. Each won a game and two games were tied.
In the game ended yesterday, Smyslov had allowed his king's pawn to be doubled on his 11th move. Later he incurred other pawn weaknesses. He apparently had confidence in his ability to defend the end game and proposed a draw on his 24th move, Fischer declined and with careful incisive play built up a winning position.
There will be no play today, but the tournament will resume at 3 P.M. tomorrow. The players tied for second are Borislav Ivkov of Yugoslavia, Johannes Donner of the Netherlands, Raimir Cholmov of the Soviet Union and Alberic O'Kelly of Belgium.
Below is Fischer's victory over Smyslov

Other results of the second round follow: Alberic O'Kelly of Belgium drew with Wolfgang Pietzsch of East Germany. Robert Wade of England adjourned with Zbygnev Doda of Poland, Lazslo Szabo of Hungary drew with Ewfim Geller of the Soviet Union, Radimir Cholmov of the Soviet Union drew with Bruno Parma of Yugoslavia, Francisco Perez of Cuba drew with Georghin Tringov of Bulgaria, Heinz Lehmann of West Germany and Victor Cioealtea, of Rumania adjourned.
Borislav Ivkov of Yugoslavia defeated Eliazer Jimenez of Cuba, Istvan Bilek of Hungary drew with Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia. Elvis Cobo of Cuba lost to Karl Robatsch of Austria, Johannes Donner of the Netherlands beat Gilberto Garcia of Cuba.
Results of the first round follow: Fischer defeated Lehmann. Cholmov defeated Tringov. O'Kelly defeated Doda, Smyslov defeated Pietzsch. The following games were tied: Victor Ciocalteca and Perez, Parma and Donner, Robatsch and Pachman and Irkov, Jimenez and Szabo, Geller and Wade. The game between Garcia and Cobs was adjourned.

Fischer Defeats Smyslov In Chess

The New York Times New York, New York Saturday, August 28, 1965 - Page 19

Chess Virtuoso: Robert James Fischer
TALL and gangling Bobby used to cry when he lost a chess game. Now he freely admits that he is the greatest chess player in the world; and a lot of experts agree even though he has not won the world's championship. Yesterday the moody, controversial young man, once called the Mozart of chess, won his second chess game by Teletype in the Capablanca Memorial tournament being held in Havana.
When Bobby Fischer was 13 years old he decided that he could beat anyone in New York in chess, so on a hot summer day he got on the subway in Brooklyn and journeyed to the Manhattan Chess Club—considered one of the toughest in the country—and challenged all comers. Several months later, at 14, the sullen and temperamental boy turned up at the club wearing dungarees, a T-shirt and sneakers and won the United States championship, a title he still holds now at the age of 2.

Learned at 6
Robert James Fischer learned the moves of chess at the age of 6, shortly after he had come to New York to live. He was born in Chicago on March 9, 1943, after which his family started a restless traipse that took them to Oregon, Arizona and California.
Bobby loved games, and he and his older sister, Joan, got a chess set and puzzled out from the directions what pieces to put where. His mother. Mrs. Regina Fischer, said that as a very young child Bobby “would get those Japanese interlocking rings, and things like that, and take things apart I couldn't figure out at all.”
School had little impact on the youngster. His intelligence quotient has never been made public, but school authorities indicated that it was in an upper percentile. “We were able to adjust to him,” one school official said.
A school teacher said, “No matter what he played he had to come out ahead of everybody. If he had been born next to a swimming pool, he would have been a swimming champion.” In his junior year, he dropped out of Brooklyn's Erasmus High School, and never returned.
After young Fischer first won the United States championship, the usually reserved chess critics could find no words to describe him. He has been called a miracle, a “fiery genius,” and the greatest natural chess player in history. Dr. Hans Kmoch, author of recondite chess treatises, once said of him that “never before in all chess history has there been such a phenomenon.”
But it was the Fischer personality as much as the Fischer genius that captured chess followers. It is a legend of the game that all its masters are meshuga — Yiddish for being a little addled. With awe and glee, his fans called the newly crowned American champion ganz meshuga.
When Fischer was 16 he turned from a poorly dressed, floppy tangle of arms and legs to a moodily handsome, brooding young man who affected $200 suits and $90 shoes. He now dresses conservatively and neatly, but not overly expensively.
Once, when asked by an interviewer if he considered himself the greatest chess player who ever lived, he answered, “Well, I don't like to put things like that in print, it sounds so egotistical. But to answer your question, yes.” Fischer's whole life is chess. All his friends play the game, and all the jokes that he thinks are funny are based on knowledge of the game. He does not drink or smoke, rarely dates girls and doesn't go to the movies. “You've seen one, you've seen them all:” he says of motion pictures.
Edward Lasker, the author of “Chess for Fun and Blood,” said that Fischer belongs to the latter category—“He always wants to kill his opponent.” Fischer plays with quick and sudden movements, never relaxing, sometimes biting his fingernails. If kibitzers press in too close he waves them off. At times he glares malevolently through partially closed hazel eyes at his opponent.

Brilliant But Controversial
Besides being the United States' most brilliant player, he is its most controversial. In July, 1961, during a match with Samuel Reshevsky, an Orthodox Jew, a game was rescheduled from a Saturday to the following morning because Reshevsky would not play on Saturday. Fischer said he was not used to playing in the morning and refused to appear. The game was declared forfeit.
Fischer then charged that the forfeit was illegal, refused to play again and Reshevsky was declared the winner by default.
Playing in Curacao in 1962, Fischer tied for fifth place behind four Russians and then accused the Russians of using collusive tactics. Many experts agreed, and a year later tournament rules were changed to make collusion more difficult.
Fischer earns about $12,000 a year from chess tournaments and magazine articles. He lives alone in the walk-up apartment on Lincoln Place in Brooklyn in which he was brought up by his mother, who was divorced from his father when Fischer was 2.

Chess Virtuoso: Robert James Fischer

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Chicago Tribune Chicago, Illinois Saturday, August 28, 1965 - Page 51

Fischer Wins Again In Chess By Telephone
Havana, Cuba, Aug. 27 [Reuters]—Bobby Fischer, the 22-year-old United States national chess champion, scored another victory by telephone today, over Russian grand master Vassily Smyslov in the International Capablanca tournament.
Fischer, who was refused permission by the United States government to go to Cuba for the tournament, has been competing by telephone from New York.

Fischer Wins Again In Chess By Telephone

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Arizona Daily Star Tucson, Arizona Saturday, August 28, 1965 - Page 6

Fischer Scores Chess Win Via Long-Distance Phone
Havana, Cuba (AP)—Bobby Fischer, the United States' young grandmaster from Brooklyn, scored a second straight victory in his long-distance chess tournament Friday, beating Vassily Smyslov when the Russian conceded in a vastly confused match.
Fischer, denied permission to visit Cuba by the U.S. State Department, is competing by telephone from New York. Jose Raul Capablanca Jr., son of the late Cuban player for whom the tournament is named, represents Fischer at the table, makes the moves relayed to him by telephone.
Friday's victory gave the 22-year-old Fischer the lead after two rounds of the 30-day Capablanca Memorial Tournament.
Their second round match started Thursday, and the players had agreed to adjourn sometime after the 40th move if the game was not near completion.
Capablanca, representing Fischer, told Smyslov in English that he was adjourning after the 43rd move. The Russian, who understands little English, appeared to understand. Then, to the amazement of the crowd, he picked up a piece and moved it.
Capablanca then repeated his decision through an interpreter. After considerable discussion, the move was relayed to Fischer in New York, giving him a considerable advantage in knowing the Russian's move. The match was resumed Friday and the Russian conceded.

Fischer Scores Chess Win Via Long-Distance Phone

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The Fresno Bee The Republican Fresno, California Saturday, August 28, 1965 - Page 3

American Wins In Long Distance Chess Tourney
Havana, Cuba (AP)—Bobby Fischer, the United States' young grandmaster from Brooklyn, scored a second straight victory in his long-distance chess tournament, beating Vassily Smyslov when the Russian conceded a vastly confused match.
Fischer, denied permission to visit Cuba by the US State Department, is competing by telephone from New York. Jose Raul Capablanca Jr., son of the late Cuban player fur whom the tournament is named, represents Fischer at the table, making his moves relayed to him by telephone.
Yesterday's victory gave the 22-year-old Fischer the lead after two rounds of the 30-day Capablanca Memorial Tournament which has drawn the world's best. He has two points with six others tied for second at 1½ points. Both he and Smyslov won their first round matches.

American Wins In Long Distance Chess Tourney

Detroit Free Press Detroit, Michigan Saturday, August 28, 1965 - Page 30

Soviets Lose In Wit War
The cold war may be a chess game in which the United States is sometimes outwitted, but when it it comes to the real thing, we've just one-upped the Russians.
Hero of the coup is Bobby Fischer, 23-year old American grand master and our boy in Havana during the Capablanca Memorial Tournament.
Actually, Fischer isn't In Havana at all, but in New York. He has to play the game by cable because the State Department wouldn't let him go to Cuba.
After 43 moves, Russia's former world champion, Vassily Smyslov, picked up Bobby's latest cable and threw in the towel. Earlier, Fischer had beaten Germany's Heinz Lehmann.

Soviets Lose In Wit War

Star Tribune Minneapolis, Minnesota Saturday, August 28, 1965 - Page 12

Fischer Whips Russian
Bobby Fischer, 22-year-old grandmaster from Brooklyn, N.Y., won out over Russian Vassily Smyslov Friday in a long-distance chess match. Fischer, denied permission to visit Cuba by the United States State Department, is competing in a Havana tournament by telephone. He has won his first two matches, and leads the tourney.

Fischer Whips Russian

Daily News New York, New York Saturday, August 28, 1965 - Page 123 () () () ()

Checkmated by Cable
Havana, Aug. 27 (UPI)—American chess champion Bobby Fischer, 22, playing by cable from New York, today defeated Russia's former world champion Vassily Smyslov in the fourth annual Capablanca Memorial Tournament. Fischer was barred by the State Department from coming to Cuba. He is scheduled to “face” his next opponent, Victor Cioaclatea of Romania, Sunday.

Checkmated by Cable

Star-Gazette Elmira, New York Saturday, August 28, 1965 - Page 8

Sidelights
Over seas chess match between Bobby Fischer, the U.S. champ from Brooklyn, and Russia's Vassily Smyslov was adjourned after 44 moves in a confused situation due apparently to a language barrier. Fischer is participating by telephone since the State Department refused him permission to visit Cuba, where the Capablanca Memorial Tournament is being held.

Sidelights

The Honolulu Advertiser Honolulu, Hawaii Saturday, August 28, 1965 - Page 3

Stalemate
UPI Photo
Bobby Fischer, 23-year-old U.S. chess master, will play international chess tournament in Havana by having his moves teletyped from New York. U.S. State Department won't let him visit Cuba.

Stalemate

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Arizona Republic Phoenix, Arizona Sunday, August 29, 1965 - Page 27

Bobby Fischer: Mysterious Master of Chess
New York Times Service
NEW YORK—Bobby Fischer used to cry when he lost a chess game. Now he admits that he is the greatest chess player in the world, and a lot of experts agree even though he has not won the world's championship.
The moody young man, once called the Mozart of Chess, has won his second chess game by teletype in the Capablanca Memorial Tournament being held in Havana.
WHEN BOBBY Fischer was 13 he decided that he could beat anyone in New York in chess, so one summer day he went to the Manhattan Chess Club where he challenged all comers.
Several months later. at 14, the sullen and temperamental youth turned up at the club wearing dungarees, a T-shirt and sneakers and won the United States championship, a title he still holds at the age, of 22.
Robert James Fischer learned the moves of chess at the age of 6. He was born in Chicago on March 9, 1943, after which his family moved to Oregon, to Arizona and to California before settling in Brooklyn.
BOBBY LOVED games, and he and his older sister, Joan, got a chess set and puzzled out the directions. His mother, Mrs. Regina Fischer, said that as a very young child Bobby “would get those Japanese interlocking rings, and things like that, and take things apart I couldn't figure out at all.”
One schoolteacher said: “No matter what he played he had to come out ahead of everybody. If he had been born next to a swimming pool, he would have been a swimming champion.
In his junior year he dropped out of Brooklyn's Erasmus High School and never returned.
AFTER HE won the U.S. championship the usually reserved chess critics could find no words to describe him. He has been called a miracle, a “fiery genius,” and the greatest natural chess player in history.
Dr. Hans Kmoch, author of Recondite Chess Treatises, once said, “Never before in all chess history has there been such a phenomenon.”
But it was the Fischer personality as much as the Fischer genius that captured the chess followers.
When he was 16 he turned from a poorly dressed tangle of arms and legs to a moodily handsome, brooding young man who affected $200 suits and $90 shoes. He now dresses conservatively and neatly, but not expensively.
Bobby Fischer's whole life is chess. All his friends play the game, and all the jokes that he thinks are funny converge on knowledge of the game. He does not drink nor smoke nor often go on dates or ever to the movies.
“You've seen one, you've seen them all,” he says of motion pictures.
EDWARD LASKER, the author of “Chess for Fun and Blood,” said that Fischer belongs to the latter category.
“He always wants to kill his opponent.”
Bobby Fischer plays his pieces with quick and sudden movements. He never relaxes his concentration during a game, although he has been known to bite his fingernails, and if kibitzers press too closely he waves them off. At times he glares malevolently through partly closed hazel eyes at his opponent.
Bobby Fischer won the first of his five U.S. championships in January 1958, and in September of that year he became the youngest international grand master in the history of the game.
HIS CHESS playing is characterized by a vast book knowledge of the game, the mastery of thousands of openings, a brilliant end game and the courage to be reckless at times, that is, to give up valuable pieces in order to get himself in a better position on the board.
Bobby Fischer earns an estimated $12,000 a year from chess tournaments and magazine articles. His book, “Games of Chess,” was published in 1959.

Bobby Fischer: Mysterious Master of Chess

Dayton Daily News Dayton, Ohio Sunday, August 29, 1965 - Page 21

U.S. Chess Champ Teletypes His Moves
BOBBY FISCHER, U.S. chess champ since the age of 14, was playing his matches via teletype last week. The reason: He was refused permission to journey to the tournament site in Havana because of State department restrictions. Staying home in New York, the moody, 22-year -old won two games. The critics concede Fisher is a chess genius (he has virtually no outside interests) and one observer called him a “killer” at the game.

U.S. Chess Champ Teletypes His Moves

The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, August 29, 1965 - Page 77

Fischer In Havana Tourney, By Phone
It is news when Bobby Fischer, 22-year-old brilliant and temperamental U.S. chess champion, announces, as he has on several occasions, that he will not play chess.
It is even better news when, after a layoff of nearly two years, he accepts an invitation to a strong international tournament. And, when the tournament is in Havana, and Fischer will play in New York, there must be a story.
For several years Cuba has sponsored a Capablanca Memorial Chess Tournament, which has attracted many of the leading world grandmasters. Fischer was invited as a matter of course.
Fischer accepted, but soon found that Americans are not traveling to Cuba these days, except in most unusual circumstances, and that the State Department frowns on the idea.
At the scheduled time Fischer sits at a hoard in the Marshall Chess Club, 23 W. 10th St., New York. He has been informed in advance who his opponent will be and who has the first move.
When Fischer moves this is immediately transmitted to his opponent in Havana. When the latter replies, the move is relayed and made on Fischer's board by a referee. The usual chess clock is used, but each player is timed at his own board.
Because of inevitable delays in communication, the telephone session will last considerably longer than in over the board play, allowing the contestants more time than usual. This is no advantage to Fischer, who generally plays much faster than his opponents.
The tournament is about to start as this is written. It will be the first real competition for Fischer since his amazing 11-0 victory in the U.S. Championship Tournament in December, 1963.

Fischer In Havana Tourney, By Phone

The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, August 29, 1965 - Page 87

Bobby Fischer at Capablanca Memorial Tournament and Viet Nam Draft
Frank Brady, former editor of the magazine Chess World, has written a book on Bobby Fischer called “Profile of a Prodigy,” reputedly a comprehensive portrait of this controversial figure and containing 75 of his games. The book is to be released at the end of this month.
The book is already a little incomplete, for the controversial Bobby Fischer is again in the news. Bobby is not in the army as previously reported, though we were informed that he had expected to be drafted.
Recently he applied for a visa to play in the Capablanca Memorial tournament in Cuba, partly on the theory that he would also function as a journalist. His application was denied.
Fischer then arranged to participate by telecommunication. Fidel Castro promptly announced a diplomatic victory.
Fischer, irritated that his name was being used for political reasons, thereupon withdrew from the tournament, indicating by cable that he would nevertheless participate if the Cuban government publicly conceded that his participation is non-political. However, the latest report is that Fischer is playing.

Chess

Bobby Fischer would not hardly have been drafted in U.S. Military. See this publication from the Worldwide Church of God,

MILITARY SERVICE and WAR by Herbert W Armstrong
Here is the biblical teaching and commands of God on military service, killing and WAR. … At the outset, bear in mind that in the United States, for example, the Selective Service and the military authorities deal with “conscientious objectors” according to the genuine sincerity of the individual, as they, not the individual, determine his sincerity.


Wow... journalistic instincts hard at work here:

Detroit Free Press Detroit, Michigan Sunday, August 29, 1965 - Page 10

Fischer Wins 2nd Game in Chess Meet
(C) New York Times Service
NEW YORK -Bobby Fischer, who used to cry when he lost a chess game. has won his second game by teletype in the Capablanca Memorial Tournament being held in Havana, Cuba.
Fischer, called the Mozart of chess, conducted the game by teletype because of a propaganda fight with Cuban Premier Fidel Castro.
Below is Fischer's second-game victory over Russia's former world champion Vassilly Smyslov.

Fischer Wins 2nd Game in Chess Meet

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The Times Shreveport, Louisiana Monday, August 30, 1965 - Page 17

U.S. Chess Champ Fires His Referee
NEW YORK (UPI) — U. S. Chess champion Bobby Fisher fired his referee Sunday an hour before he resumed his long-distance play in the Capablanca Memorial Chess tournament in Havana, Cuba.
The referee, Frank Brady, 31, said he received a long-distance call shortly before 2 p.m. from Fischer's attorney in Massachusetts who said that the young chess master didn't want him around. I talked to Bobby later and he said he felt it would disturb his concentration if I was in the same room with him,” Brady said. “The problem is with the book I wrote about him. He didn't like it.”
Fischer, 22, began play at 3 p.m. via cable to Havana with Romania's Victor Ciocâltea in the third game of the 22-game tournament. He is competing by cable because the State Department refused his permission to go to Cuba.
Brady said the “boy wonder” had read his book, “Profile of a Prodigy,” in galley form and “He didn't like it then. In fact, I was surprised when he called me last Thursday to ask me to be the referee.”
A variety of referees sat in on the first week of play and Brady was on hand only Thursday night when Fischer defeated Russia's former world champion, Vassily Smyslov, who conceded after 43 moves.
Brady said, “My book came out last week and I think Bobby re-read it and decided to fire me because he doesn't like people tampering with his private life.”

U.S. Chess Champ Fires His Referee

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The Pittsburgh Press Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Monday, August 30, 1965 - Page 2

U.S Champion Bobby Fischer vs. Victor Cioaciltea
U.S. Chess Champion Bobby Fischer played to draw in 48 moves with Romania's Victor Cioaciltea today in the Capablanca Memorial Chess Tournament.
Fischer played at a chess club in New York via teletype to Cuba, where the Capablanca tournament is being held.
Both Fischer and Cioaciltea received a score of one-half point for the draw. Fischer was next scheduled to play Alberic O'Kelly of Belgium.

U.S Champion Bobby Fischer vs. Victor Cioaciltea

The Journal Herald Dayton, Ohio Tuesday, August 31, 1965 - Page 41

Chess Champ Has Problems With Play By Cable
NEW YORK — (UPI) — U.S. chess champion Bobby Fischer was scheduled to play a match with Alberic O'Kelly of Belgium yesterday after failing to further his position in the Capablanca memorial chess tournament in play with a Romanian champion.
The 22 - year - old American played to a draw in 48 moves with Romania's Victor Cioaciltea yesterday morning. Both players received a score of one-half point for the match, which began Sunday.
Fischer fired his referee, Frank Brady, an hour before the Cioaciltea match was to begin. Brady had been supervising the young chess champion move on a demonstration chessboard in a chess club here.
The moves are relayed by teletype to Havana where the tournament is being played.
Fischer is playing the 22-game tournament via cable because the state department would not issue him a visa to Communist Cuba.
Brady said he received a call from Fischer's attorney in Massachusetts saying it “disturbed Fischer's concentration” to have Brady in the same room with him.
“The problem is the book I wrote about him,” said Brady. “He didn't like it. It isn't flattering.”
Fischer defeated Russia's former world champion, Vassily Smyslov, who conceded after 43 moves last Thursday. He also won his second match. The Cioacaltea match was his third.

Chess Champ Has Problems With Play By Cable

Chicago Tribune Chicago, Illinois Tuesday, August 31, 1965 - Page 44

Fischer Gains Long Distance Draw In Chess
New York, Aug. 30 (UPI) — Bobby Fischer, United States chess champion, played to a draw in 48 moves with Romania's Victor Cioaciltea today in the Capablanca Memorial Chess tournament.
Fischer played at a chess club here via teletype to Cuba, where the Capablanca tournament is being held.
Fischer and Cioaciltea each received a score of one-half point for the draw. The 22-year-old American champ fired his referee yesterday only an hour before he was scheduled to begin a match with Cioaciltea.

Fischer Gains Long Distance Draw In Chess

The Corpus Christi Caller-Times Corpus Christi, Texas Tuesday, August 31, 1965 - Page 16

Diplomatic Chess
(Reprinted from the Christian Science Monitor)
Checkmated by the State Department in his efforts to go to Cuba for an international chess tournament, the United States chess champion is going to play by cable.
This will not be the first chess played by remote control. But since all the other players will be permitted to be on the scene it recalls the comment of the legendary Hollywood producer talking about “message” pictures: “If you have a message, send it by Western Union.”
With the American champion, Bobby Fischer, making his moves by wire, the whole world will get the message that the mighty United States is preventing its chess hero from going to little Cuba.
To Mr. Fischer's credit, he refused to play even by wire until Premier Castro assured him he had no propagandistic intentions.
“Our country has no need for such fleeting propaganda,” Dr. Castro is reported to have replied.
Surely many Americans must be thinking, “Our country has no need of keeping chess champions out of Havana.”
The State Department doubtless has its reasons for making no exception to regulations. Yet it would seem that any propaganda that ensues will be the result of its own move on the diplomatic chessboard.

Diplomatic Chess

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The San Bernardino County Sun San Bernardino, California Tuesday, August 31, 1965 - Page 11

Fischer Tied for Chess Lead After Draw on 47th Move
HAVANA, Cuba (AP) — Bobby Fischer, the United States' 22-year-old grandmaster, tied with Romania's Victor Cioacaltea yesterday in a third round game in the Capablanca Memorial Chess Tournament.
Fischer, denied permission to visit Cuba by the U.S. State Department, is participating in the international tournament by telephone and telegraph. Fischer is in New York. His moves, and those of his opponent, are wired to and from Havana.
Cioacaltea was on the verge of victory several times, but Fischer firmed up his game and reversed his bad position by the 41st move. The game was adjourned as a tie after the 47th move.
The deadlock left Fischer in a three-way tie for first with Jolmov of Russia and Donner of the Netherlands. Each has 2½ points.
Fischer had won both of his earlier games. The fourth round of the 30-day tournament was to be played later yesterday but probably will not be completed until today.

Fischer Tied for Chess Lead After Draw on 47th Move

The San Francisco Examiner San Francisco, California Tuesday, August 31, 1965 - Page 13

U.S. Chess Champ In Tense Contest
NEW YORK—(UPI) U.S. chess champion Bobby Fischer was embroiled last night in a long, tense match with Belgium's Alberic O'Kelly.
Earlier he failed to further his position in the Capablanca Memorial Chess Tournament in play with a Romanian champion.
At a turning point in his match with O'Kelly, Fischer refused to accept a draw—which would have been his second of the day—and there was no indication when the game would end.
The 22 year old Fischer played to a draw in 48 moves with Romania's Victor Cioaciltea. Both players received one-half point.
Fischer is playing the 22-game tournament via cable because the State Department would not issue him a visa to Cuba.

U.S. Chess Champ In Tense Contest

The Miami News Miami, Florida Tuesday, August 31, 1965 - Page 12

Russian Beats Briton In Chess
HAVANA, Cuba (AP) — Vassily Smyslov of Russia defeated Robert Wade of Britain in a fourth-round match last night and took over a share of the lead in the Capablanca Memorial Chess Tournament. Smyslov defeated Wade after 31 moves.
A telephoned match between the U. S. grandmaster, Bobby Fischer of New York, and Alberik O'Kelly of Belgium was adjourned after the 41st move and will be completed today.

Russian Beats Briton In Chess

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The Vincennes Sun-Commercial Vincennes, Indiana Wednesday, September 01, 1965 - Page 15

Bobby Fischer Winning at Chess From Distance
New York (AP) — Bobby Fischer, 22, U.S, chess champion, has won his third long-distance game in the Casablanca memorial tournament.
The tournament is being played in Havana but Fischer is cabling his moves from New York because the State Department refused him a visa to visit Cuba.
Tuesday night he defeated Gueorghia D. Tringov of Bulgaria in 22 moves.

Bobby Fischer Winning at Chess From Distance

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The Courier-Journal Louisville, Kentucky Wednesday, September 01, 1965 - Page 4

U.S. Champ Again Wins In 22-Move 'Masterpiece'
From AP and L.A. Times-Washington Post Service Dispatches
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S chess champion Bobby Fischer won his third long-distance game of the Capablanca Memorial Tournament last night in a game that one expert said “will go down in chess history.”
The 22-year-old champion beat his opponent, Gueorghia D. Tringov of Bulgaria, in 22 moves.
“The game was a masterpiece,” said Saul Rubin, president of the Marshall Chess Club. Fischer is cabling his moves from the club to tournament headquarters in Havana because the State Department refused to grant him a visa to visit Cuba.
Rubin said Fischer's game was “extremely brilliant and complex.” At one point, he said, Tringov did not believe one of Fischer's moves and had to telephone New York on the chess “hot line” to confirm it.
“He thought it was a losing move, but really it was a winning move,” Rubin said.

Fischer Wins 3 Of 5 Games
In five games so far, Fischer has won three, against Heinz Lehmann of West Germany, former world champion Vassily Smyslov of the Soviet Union, and Tringov. He had a draw against Romania's Victor Cioaciltea. His fourth game. against Belgium's Alberic O'Kelly, was adjourned yesterday until Friday after 54 moves had been played.
Smyslov, 44, resigned in his game with Fischer after an overnight adjournment. Speaking in English over a direct telephone line which supplements the teletype used for moves, he congratulated the surprised American on winning. Earlier Smyslov had proposed a draw on his 24th move, but Fischer declined and went on to build up a stronger position.

Smyslov and Fischer had met before, during a challengers' tournament in Yugoslavia in 1959. Each won a game and two games were tied.
Here is Fischer's victory:

U.S. Champ Again Wins In 22-Move 'Masterpiece'

Arizona Daily Star Tucson, Arizona Wednesday, September 01, 1965 - Page 23

Fischer Wins 3rd Distance Chess Game
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. chess champion Bobby Fischer won his third long-distance game of the Capablanca Memorial Tournament Tuesday night in a game that one expert said “will go down in chess history.”
The 22-year-old champion beat his opponent, Gueorghia D. Tringov of Bulgaria, in 22 moves. “The game was a master-piece,” said Saul Rubin, president of the Marshall Chess Club. Fischer is cabling his moves from the club to the tournament headquarters in Havana, because the State Department refused to grant him a visa to visit Cuba.
Rubin said Fischer's game was “extremely brilliant and complex.” At one point, he said, Tringov did not believe one of Fischer's moves and had to telephone New York on the chess “hot line” to confirm it.
“He thought it was a losing move, but really it was a winning move,” Rubin said.
Fischer has started five games, and won three. One was a draw. Another, the fourth one he started, has been postponed twice.

Fischer Wins 3rd Distance Chess Game

The Pittsburgh Press Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Wednesday, September 01, 1965 - Page 19

U.S. Chess Ace Whips Bulgarian
NEW YORK, Sept. 1 (UPI)—U. S. chess champion Bobby Fischer defeated Bulgaria's Guergoi Tringov in 22 moves in his fifth-round match in Havana's Capablanca Tournament.
Last night's victory put the undefeated, once-tied Mr. Fischer in a six-way second place deadlock behind tourney leader Vassily Smyslov of Russia, a former world champion.
Experts at the Marshall Chess Club in Manhattan, where Mr. Fischer is playing, via teletype to Havana because the State Department refused him permission to go to Communist Cuba, called the game one of “great brilliance and theoretical importance.”

U.S. Chess Ace Whips Bulgarian

The Journal Herald Dayton, Ohio Wednesday, September 01, 1965 - Page 32

Chess Champion Wins Respite
NEW YORK — (UPI) — U.S. chess champion Bobby Fischer's fourth match in the Capablanca tournament in Havana has been adjourned until Friday after 14 tense moves in play with Belgium's Alberic O'Kelly.
A total of 54 moves have been made in the match, which began Monday. The 22-year-old American had a slight advantage of six pawns to O'Kelly's five at adjournment. Some observers thought Fischer could win.
Fischer won his first two matches in the tournament and played to a draw in the third. His moves are relayed to Havana by cable because the U.S. State Department would not issue. Fischer a visa to enter Communist Cuba.
Fischer faces 18 more games after he completes the match with O'Kelly.

Chess Champion Wins Respite

The Des Moines Register, Des Moines, Iowa, Friday, December 31, 1965 - Page 2

Chess Tourney
The final round of the U.S. Championship Chess Tournament was adjourned in New York City with the deciding game between Bobby Fischer and Dr. Karl Burger, also a New Yorker, still unfinished.
A win for Fischer, the world champion, would give him the title. The game is to be continued today. Should Fischer lose, he could tie with Samuel Reshevsky of Spring Valley, N.Y. and Robert Byrne of Indianapolis if they win their final-round matches.

Chess Tourney

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1965 “Bobby Fischer Chess” Articles

January 1965

February 1965

March 1965

April 1965

May 1965

June 1965

July 1965

August 1965

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () () (Image) The Miami News Miami, Florida Tuesday, August 03, 1965 - Page 14, “Chess Champ Can't Play Cuba”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Gazette and Daily York, Pennsylvania Tuesday, August 03, 1965 - Page 2, “State Dept. Bars U.S. Chess Champion From International Tourney In Cuba”

  3. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Tuesday, August 03, 1965 - Page 18, “U.S. Refuses Chess Champ Cuba Passport”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The New York Times New York, New York Wednesday, August 04, 1965 - Page 34, “Bobby Fischer Checkmated”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Detroit Free Press Detroit, Michigan Wednesday, August 04, 1965 - Page 4, “U.S. Checks Chess Champion”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Leader-Post Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada Wednesday, August 04, 1965 - Page 12, “No trip for chess champion”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Cincinnati Enquirer Cincinnati, Ohio Thursday, August 05, 1965 - Page 9, “Chess Champ Denied Visa To Visit Cuba”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Fresno Bee The Republican Fresno, California Friday, August 06, 1965 - Page 43, “Chess Player Ban”
  9. (Vague Mention) () The Daily Oklahoman Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Friday, August 06, 1965 - Page 26, “The World”
  10. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) St. Louis Post-Dispatch St. Louis, Missouri Saturday, August 07, 1965 - Page 4, “A Brilliant Defensive Move”
  11. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Arizona Daily Star Tucson, Arizona Sunday, August 08, 1965 - Page 2, “Chess Champ Will Play Cuba Tourney By Phone”

  12. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Star Tribune Minneapolis, Minnesota Sunday, August 08, 1965 - Page 40, “Silly Chess”
  13. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Chippewa Herald-Telegram Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin Monday, August 09, 1965 - Page 2, “Chess Playing Will Kill Cuba”
  14. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Somerset Daily American Somerset, Pennsylvania Monday, August 09, 1965 - Page 5, “Chess King Fischer Will Use Phones”

  15. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Detroit Free Press Detroit, Michigan Monday, August 09, 1965 - Page 8, “Chess Champ Checkmates U.S.”
  16. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Des Moines Register Des Moines, Iowa Tuesday, August 10, 1965 - Page 4, “Iron Curtain Bureaucracy”
  17. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Baltimore Sun Baltimore, Maryland Tuesday, August 10, 1965 - Page 14, “Checkmate”
  18. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Times Colonist Victoria, British Columbia, Canada Tuesday, August 10, 1965 - Page 5, “Castro Plays Smart To Checkmate U.S.”

  19. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The South Bend Tribune South Bend, Indiana Tuesday, August 10, 1965 - Page 5, “Chess Player To Compete Via Telephone”

  20. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Central New Jersey Home News New Brunswick, New Jersey Tuesday, August 10, 1965 - Page 10, “Fischer Impasse Delights Fidel”

  21. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Tuesday, August 10, 1965 - Page 8, “Chess by Long-Distance”
  22. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () () (Image) The Record Hackensack, New Jersey Tuesday, August 10, 1965 - Page 26, “Student Travel To Cuba Has Been Halted”

  23. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Detroit Free Press Detroit, Michigan Wednesday, August 11, 1965 - Page 6, “Checkmated?”
  24. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The News Journal Wilmington, Delaware Wednesday, August 11, 1965 - Page 22, “Not 'Within the Criteria'”
  25. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Wilkes-Barre Times Leader, The Evening News Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania Thursday, August 12, 1965 - Page 11, “Chess Champ Withdraws From Play: Objects To Castro's Remarks Claiming A Propaganda Victory”

  26. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Des Moines Tribune Des Moines, Iowa Thursday, August 12, 1965 - Page 13, “Chess King Rips Castro”

  27. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Orlando Sentinel Orlando, Florida Thursday, August 12, 1965 - Page 61, “Chess Champ Angry With Fidel's Move”

  28. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Berkshire Eagle Pittsfield, Massachusetts Thursday, August 12, 1965 - Page 2, “Fischer Refuses Castro's Gambit In Chess Tourney”
  29. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Fresno Bee The Republican Fresno, California Thursday, August 12, 1965 - Page 48, “State Goofed”
  30. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Lincoln Star Lincoln, Nebraska Friday, August 13, 1965 - Page 10, “Castro: No Political Hay Over Chess Meet”

  31. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Miami News Miami, Florida Friday, August 13, 1965 - Page 12, “Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro”
  32. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Central New Jersey Home News New Brunswick, New Jersey Friday, August 13, 1965 - Page 16, “Castro Cables Chess Champ Denying Propaganda Motives”

  33. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Minneapolis Star Minneapolis, Minnesota Monday, August 16, 1965 - Page 4, “A Nonsensical Chess Gambit”
  34. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Sioux City Journal Sioux City, Iowa Wednesday, August 18, 1965 - Page 4, “Press Comment: Game of Kings”
  35. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Green Bay Press-Gazette Green Bay, Wisconsin Friday, August 20, 1965 - Page 4, “Checkmate for Chess Player”

  36. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Gazette Montreal, Quebec, Canada Saturday, August 21, 1965 - Page 15, “Chess King No Pawn”
  37. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Great Falls Tribune Great Falls, Montana Sunday, August 22, 1965 - Page 37, “Youthful Chess Master”
  38. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Star Tribune Minneapolis, Minnesota Sunday, August 22, 1965 - Page 28, “Checkmate: Fischer Will Participate in Capablanca Memorial Tournament”
  39. (Vague Mention) () The San Francisco Examiner San Francisco, California Sunday, August 22, 1965 - Page 158, “People's Weekly News Quiz”
  40. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Arizona Daily Star Tucson, Arizona Sunday, August 22, 1965 - Page 5, “Fischer Will Play In Cuban Chess Match”

  41. (Vague Mention) () The Fresno Bee The Republican Fresno, California Sunday, August 22, 1965 - Page 27, “Chess in Cuba”
  42. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Press-Tribune Roseville, California Tuesday, August 24, 1965 - Page 14, “A Paper Curtain Of Our Own”

  43. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Marshall News Messenger Marshall, Texas Tuesday, August 24, 1965 - Page 4, “Stuffy”
  44. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Record Hackensack, New Jersey Wednesday, August 25, 1965 - Page 44, “Chess Champ To Vie By Phone”
  45. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Miami News Miami, Florida Wednesday, August 25, 1965 - Page 10, “Chess Game Begins By Telegraph”

  46. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Pittsburgh Press Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Wednesday, August 25, 1965 - Page 2, “Fourth Capablanca Chess Tournament”
  47. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Miami News Miami, Florida Thursday, August 26, 1965 - Page 10, “Yank Cables Chess Plays To Havana”

  48. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Odessa American Odessa, Texas Thursday, August 26, 1965 - Page 33, “Chess Master”

  49. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Daily World Opelousas, Louisiana Thursday, August 26, 1965 - Page 1, “Chess Played by Teletype”
  50. (Poor Quality) () The Press-Tribune Roseville, California Thursday, August 26, 1965 - Page 2, “Bobby Fischer vs Heinz Lehman”
  51. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The South Bend Tribune South Bend, Indiana Thursday, August 26, 1965 - Page 17, “American Wins Chess Match”

  52. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () () (Image) The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Thursday, August 26, 1965 - Page 24, “Checkmate”
  53. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Philadelphia Daily News Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Thursday, August 26, 1965 - Page 3, “An American Knight 'In' Cuba”
  54. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Star Tribune Minneapolis, Minnesota Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 20, “Long-Distance Chess”

  55. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) St. Louis Post-Dispatch St. Louis, Missouri Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 24, “Fischer Defeats Russian In Cuban Chess Event”

  56. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Pittsburgh Press Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 2, “Fischer Defeats Smyslov”

  57. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () () () (Image) Star-Gazette Elmira, New York Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 27, “Yank Advances In Chess Tourney”

  58. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Tampa Bay Times St. Petersburg, Florida Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 10, “Cable Chess Game Opens”
  59. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The San Francisco Examiner San Francisco, California Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 20, “No Pawn of Fate”
  60. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Orlando Sentinel Orlando, Florida Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 42, “Fischer Cops Chess Match”
  61. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The News-Messenger Fremont, Ohio Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 8, “New York-Havana Contest”

  62. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Independent Long Beach, California Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 2, “Chess Win”
  63. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Times Colonist Victoria, British Columbia, Canada Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 29, “Fischer Wins First Match”
  64. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The News Journal Wilmington, Delaware Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 37, “Bobby Fischer vs. Vassily Smyslov”
  65. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) News-Journal Mansfield, Ohio Friday, August 27, 1965 - Page 8, “Teletype Tournament”

  66. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Chicago Tribune Chicago, Illinois Saturday, August 28, 1965 - Page 51, “Fischer Wins Again In Chess By Telephone”

  67. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Arizona Daily Star Tucson, Arizona Saturday, August 28, 1965 - Page 6, “Fischer Scores Chess Win Via Long-Distance Phone”

  68. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The New York Times New York, New York Saturday, August 28, 1965 - Page 19, “Fischer Defeats Smyslov In Chess: Russian Telephones His Resignation From Cuba”
  69. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The New York Times New York, New York Saturday, August 28, 1965 - Page 19, “Chess Virtuoso: Robert James Fischer”
  70. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Fresno Bee The Republican Fresno, California Saturday, August 28, 1965 - Page 3, “American Wins In Long Distance Chess Tourney”

  71. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Detroit Free Press Detroit, Michigan Saturday, August 28, 1965 - Page 30, “Soviets Lose In Wit War”
  72. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Star Tribune Minneapolis, Minnesota Saturday, August 28, 1965 - Page 12, “Fischer Whips Russian”
  73. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () () () () (Image) Daily News New York, New York Saturday, August 28, 1965 - Page 123, “Checkmated by Cable”
  74. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Star-Gazette Elmira, New York Saturday, August 28, 1965 - Page 8, “Sidelights: Overseas Chess Match”
  75. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Honolulu Advertiser Honolulu, Hawaii Saturday, August 28, 1965 - Page 3, “Stalemate”
  76. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Arizona Republic Phoenix, Arizona Sunday, August 29, 1965 - Page 27, “Bobby Fischer: Mysterious Master of Chess”

  77. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Dayton Daily News Dayton, Ohio Sunday, August 29, 1965 - Page 21, “U.S. Chess Champ Teletypes His Moves”
  78. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, August 29, 1965 - Page 77, “Fischer In Havana Tourney, By Phone”
  79. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, August 29, 1965 - Page 87, “Bobby Fischer at Capablanca Memorial Tournament and Viet Nam Draft”
  80. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Detroit Free Press Detroit, Michigan Sunday, August 29, 1965 - Page 10, “Fischer Wins 2nd Game in Chess Meet”
  81. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Times Shreveport, Louisiana Monday, August 30, 1965 - Page 17, “U.S. Chess Champ Fires His Referee”

  82. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Pittsburgh Press Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Monday, August 30, 1965 - Page 2, “U.S Champion Bobby Fischer vs. Victor Cioaciltea”

  83. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Journal Herald Dayton, Ohio Tuesday, August 31, 1965 - Page 41, “Chess Champ Has Problems With Play By Cable”
  84. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Chicago Tribune Chicago, Illinois Tuesday, August 31, 1965 - Page 44, “Fischer Gains Long Distance Draw In Chess”
  85. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Corpus Christi Caller-Times Corpus Christi, Texas Tuesday, August 31, 1965 - Page 16, “Diplomatic Chess”
  86. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The San Bernardino County Sun San Bernardino, California Tuesday, August 31, 1965 - Page 11, “Fischer Tied for Chess Lead After Draw on 47th Move”

  87. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The San Francisco Examiner San Francisco, California Tuesday, August 31, 1965 - Page 13, “U.S. Chess Champ In Tense Contest”
  88. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Miami News Miami, Florida Tuesday, August 31, 1965 - Page 12, “Russian Beats Briton In Chess”

September 1965

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Vincennes Sun-Commercial Vincennes, Indiana Wednesday, September 01, 1965 - Page 15, “Bobby Fischer Winning at Chess From Distance”

  2. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Courier-Journal Louisville, Kentucky Wednesday, September 01, 1965 - Page 4, “U.S. Champ Again Wins In 22-Move 'Masterpiece'”

  3. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) Arizona Daily Star Tucson, Arizona Wednesday, September 01, 1965 - Page 23, “Fischer Wins 3rd Distance Chess Game”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Pittsburgh Press Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Wednesday, September 01, 1965 - Page 19, “U.S. Chess Ace Whips Bulgarian”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Journal Herald Dayton, Ohio Wednesday, September 01, 1965 - Page 32, “Chess Champion Wins Respite”

October 1965

November 1965

December 1965

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1965 Blog) () (Image) The Des Moines Register, Des Moines, Iowa, Friday, December 31, 1965 - Page 2, “Chess Tourney”
Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess
“Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess”

by Bobby Fischer
Chess Fundamentals by Jose Raul Capablanca
“Chess Fundamentals”

by Jose Raul Capablanca
My 60 Memorable Games by Bobby Fischer
“My 60 Memorable Games”

by Bobby Fischer
Morphy's Games of Chess by Philip Sergeant
“Morphy's Games of Chess”

by Philip Sergeant

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